Dominion: The Image of God and the Feminine Experience

Probably no other topic has engaged my interest as the imago Dei—what it means for humans to be made in God’s image.

My interest in the topic began as a personal exploration of my own identity and has blossomed over the years into a long-term research project. It turns out that there are more facets to the imago Dei than are dreamed of in our theology.

Besides my book The Liberating Image: The Imago Dei in Genesis 1 (Brazos, 2005), I’ve written over a dozen journal articles, book chapters, encyclopedia entries, and blog posts on various aspects of the subject. And I am deepening my understanding of the imago Dei all the time.

The Image of God in the Ancient Near East and in the Modern World

I was recently interviewed on the subject of the image of God by Deb Gregory for the Betwixt podcast series.

The interview I participated in, which is fifth in a series on “The Image of God and the Feminine Experience,” addresses whether the so-called “functional” interpretation of the imago Dei, which involves human “rule” or “dominion” over the earth (a view that I have argued for in my writings), excludes women—either explicitly or implicitly.

Deb Gregory starts the podcast with an excellent overview of the ancient Near Eastern background to the functional view of the image of God, then raises the question of whether this includes women.

The thirty-five minute interview starts at about the ten minute mark, and is followed by Deb’s brilliant five-minute meditation on implications of the discussion.

You can listen to the podcast  on the Missio Alliance website or on Sound Cloud, which is the home for Betwixt podcasts.

Here is Deb’s description of the interview topic:

Near the end of the twentieth century, the Functional View of the image of God emerged with virtual consensus among Old Testament scholars. The discovery of ancient texts which used “image of God” language in reference to kings and cult images led scholars to recast the imago Dei in terms of how a king or priest functions as a royal representation of God.

The Functional View asserts that man was created to be God’s physical representation on earth and to function as his agent and vice-regent in exercising dominion. But what about women? Was Eve also made in the image of God or was she a derivation of the man from whom she was extracted? Did she also possess this royal dominion or was she created to submit under the authority of the man who acted alone as God’s royal representative?

In conversation with theologian J. Richard Middleton, Betwixt explores the Functional View along with questions it raises about dominion, power, gender, ecology, and politics.

The Betwixt Podcast Series on the “Image of God”

If you are interested, you can access all the podcasts on the “The Image of God and the Feminine Experience” on the Missio Alliance website.

1. Introduction to the Image of God & the Feminine Experience

2. Female Men of God & the Early Church

3. Are Women Rational? Let’s Ask Google!

4. Sex Difference & the Image of God

5. Dominion

Other Betwixt Podcasts (including interviews with Walter Brueggemann)

You can listen to other Betwixt podcasts here, including a couple of great conversations with Old Testament scholar Walter Brueggemann.

Why “Betwixt”?

Here is the website explanation of what the Betwixt podcast tries to accomplish:

The Betwixt podcast is devoted to the betwixing space where faith and culture converge. This intersection, at once sacred and dangerous, sanctions the shedding of our past and the mantling of our becoming. Conversations with fascinating guests will coax us out of our ideological trenches with betwixting stories from the middle space.

 

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Science and Faith in Canada (May 11–14, 2018 Conference at Trinity Western University, Langley, BC)

The Canadian Scientific & Christian Affiliation is holding a conference dealing with science and Christianity in Canada, co-hosted by Trinity Western University, on May 11–14, 2018. This conference will include Canadians in science, speakers dealing with issues relevant to the theme, and talks on science and Christian faith in general.

I will be one of the keynote speakers (on “Human Distinctiveness and the Origin of Evil in Biblical and Evolutionary Perspectives”), along with University of British Columbia president Santa Ono (on “Science And Faith: Servant Leadership and the Secular University”), Dennis Danielson (on “Copernicus and the Structure of the Universe”), Robert Mann (on “The Edge: Physics and Theology”), Kathryn Hayhoe (on “Christians, Climate Science, and our Culture”), and Janet Danielson (whose musical piece “Six Pieces of a Reverberant Cosmos” will be performed). There will also be the screening of a movie called “Making Peace With Creation” followed by a panel discussion.

Breakout Sessions

Fifty breakout sessions are scheduled on topics like artificial intelligence, creation care, origins, and more. There is even a session entitled “A Physicist, Geographer, and a Biologist Go Into a Church, and” (which I’d like to hear).

I happen to know a number of the presenters, including Gord Carkner, who will be speaking on “Scientism and the Search for an Integrated Reality,” Doug Harink, whose talk is entitled “The Burning Bush, the Theotokos, and the Theology-Science Relationship,” and Janet Warren, who will be addressing “Addiction: Discomfort and Denial.”

Sky Gala

There is a “Sky Gala” on Saturday evening, which is open to the public. The evening features a talk by renowned climate scientist Katharine Hayhoe (Texas Tech) and a cosmos-themed concert by Janet Danielson (Lecturer and Instructor, School for the Contemporary Arts, Simon Fraser University) and the Isotone Ensemble (Oakridge, Tennessee). The evening will conclude with a reception featuring hors d’oeuvres.

Conference Schedule

The conference, running from Friday dinner through Monday lunch, will include morning devotions and a Sunday morning worship service.

You can download the entire conference schedule of keynote speakers and breakout sessions here.

Registration

For further conference details, including registration, see the CSCA conference website.

You can see a video with registration instructions here.

Early-bird rates end March 31.

For those unable attend the entire conference, single-day tickets are available, and the Saturday evening gala can be attended as a stand-alone event. The conference fees are low to moderate, with discounted on- and off-campus lodging options. Those who also attend the nearby Regent College Pastors’ Conference (May 9-11, ending with lunch) will receive a 25% conference registration discount for both conferences.

Scholarships

Scholarships are available to cover student attendance & travel. Registration includes meals.

For questions, please email Mark McEwan.

Plenary Presenters


Dennis Danielson, Ph.D.
(Professor and Former Chair, Department of English, University Of British Columbia)

Janet Danielson, M.F.A.
(Lecturer and Instructor, School for the Contemporary Arts, Simon Fraser University)

Katharine Hayhoe, Ph.D.
(Director, Climate Science Center, Texas Tech University)

Robert B. Mann, Ph.D.
(Professor of Physics & Astronomy, University of Waterloo)

J Richard Middleton, Ph.D.
(Professor of Biblical Worldview & Exegesis, Northeastern Seminary)

Santa J. Ono, Ph.D.
(President & Vice-Chancellor, University of British Columbia)

Jesus Is Risen! So What?

As we enter Holy Week, culminating in Easter this coming Sunday, BioLogos is publishing a number of short online articles about the resurrection of Jesus under the general rubric of “Resurrection: Answering the Skeptics.”

Resurrection.” Giovanni Bellini (1479)

I have contributed a couple of these articles, both of which have been published today.

Why Is the Resurrection of Jesus Important?

The first one is called “Why Is the Bodily Resurrection of Jesus Important for Christian Faith?

My approach is to view the resurrection as testimony to God’s valuation of the embodied nature of reality, which is evident in creation, the incarnation, and the new creation. In connection with the new creation, I draw on Paul’s notion of the resurrection of Jesus as the “firstfruits” of a harvest that is to come.

You can read the article here, including the discussion that ensued.

What Do We Do with the Multiple Accounts of Jesus’s Resurrection?

My second piece is called “Why Are There Multiple Accounts of Jesus’s Resurrection in the Bible?” Here I’ve tried to explain why the various accounts of the resurrection in the Gospels (which don’t quite harmonize with each other) isn’t a problem for me, but actually makes them more believable.

Facebook Live Discussion of the Resurrection

These two articles, along with others, are meant to lead up to the Facebook Live event this evening at 7:00 pm EST that BioLogos is hosting. As I explained in my blog posted last week, I will be joining three other Christians (one philosopher and two scientists) to answer questions about the significance of the resurrection.

You can join the discussion by going to the BioLogos Facebook page.

Can a Scientist Believe in the Resurrection?

In preparation for this event, you might be interested in reading some of the other BioLogos articles on the resurrection.

Yesterday BioLogos posted a two-part article called “Can a Scientist Believe in the Resurrection?”

In Part 1 four scientists responded to the following question:

As a scientist, you are trained to be skeptical about extraordinary claims—and the Resurrection is definitely an extraordinary claim. On what basis do you accept this claim as true?

In Part 2 three scientists responded to a related question:

Is belief in the Resurrection unscientific? What would you say to someone who challenges your scientific credentials because you believe that a dead man walked out of the grave?

N. T. Wright on the Resurrection

On the topic of the resurrection, I especially recommend Jim Stump’s “Still Surprised by Easter,” in which he shares what he (the senior editor at BioLogos) learned from reading N. T. Wright’s book The Resurrection of the Son of God over the Lenten season a few years ago.

I myself found Wright’s book extremely helpful when I was working on A New Heaven and a New Earth.

More on Science and the Resurrection

If you want to read a bit more, there is an excellent article on the BioLogos website called “Does Modern Science Make Miracles Impossible?” The author clearly shows that it is entirely coherent to accept that God usually works through natural processes and yet sometimes (as a sign of the coming Kingdom) brings about events that cannot be explained by natural processes.

The implication is that David Hume’s famous argument against the possibility of miracles is not really an argument, but simply a disposition.

This is precisely the thrust of an older, but illuminating article on the BioLogos website by historian Rick Kennedy called “Did David Hume ‘Banish’ Miracles?” I highly recommend this article for anyone (not just philosophers) interested in the topic.

And BioLogos just reprinted a helpful piece from the Huffinton Post called “Does the Resurrection Contradict Science?

I wish you good reading.

And I look forward to interacting with anyone interested tonight on Facebook Live.