Jesus Is Risen! So What?

As we enter Holy Week, culminating in Easter this coming Sunday, BioLogos is publishing a number of short online articles about the resurrection of Jesus under the general rubric of “Resurrection: Answering the Skeptics.”

Resurrection.” Giovanni Bellini (1479)

I have contributed a couple of these articles, both of which have been published today.

Why Is the Resurrection of Jesus Important?

The first one is called “Why Is the Bodily Resurrection of Jesus Important for Christian Faith?

My approach is to view the resurrection as testimony to God’s valuation of the embodied nature of reality, which is evident in creation, the incarnation, and the new creation. In connection with the new creation, I draw on Paul’s notion of the resurrection of Jesus as the “firstfruits” of a harvest that is to come.

You can read the article here, including the discussion that ensued.

What Do We Do with the Multiple Accounts of Jesus’s Resurrection?

My second piece is called “Why Are There Multiple Accounts of Jesus’s Resurrection in the Bible?” Here I’ve tried to explain why the various accounts of the resurrection in the Gospels (which don’t quite harmonize with each other) isn’t a problem for me, but actually makes them more believable.

Facebook Live Discussion of the Resurrection

These two articles, along with others, are meant to lead up to the Facebook Live event this evening at 7:00 pm EST that BioLogos is hosting. As I explained in my blog posted last week, I will be joining three other Christians (one philosopher and two scientists) to answer questions about the significance of the resurrection.

You can join the discussion by going to the BioLogos Facebook page.

Can a Scientist Believe in the Resurrection?

In preparation for this event, you might be interested in reading some of the other BioLogos articles on the resurrection.

Yesterday BioLogos posted a two-part article called “Can a Scientist Believe in the Resurrection?”

In Part 1 four scientists responded to the following question:

As a scientist, you are trained to be skeptical about extraordinary claims—and the Resurrection is definitely an extraordinary claim. On what basis do you accept this claim as true?

In Part 2 three scientists responded to a related question:

Is belief in the Resurrection unscientific? What would you say to someone who challenges your scientific credentials because you believe that a dead man walked out of the grave?

N. T. Wright on the Resurrection

On the topic of the resurrection, I especially recommend Jim Stump’s “Still Surprised by Easter,” in which he shares what he (the senior editor at BioLogos) learned from reading N. T. Wright’s book The Resurrection of the Son of God over the Lenten season a few years ago.

I myself found Wright’s book extremely helpful when I was working on A New Heaven and a New Earth.

More on Science and the Resurrection

If you want to read a bit more, there is an excellent article on the BioLogos website called “Does Modern Science Make Miracles Impossible?” The author clearly shows that it is entirely coherent to accept that God usually works through natural processes and yet sometimes (as a sign of the coming Kingdom) brings about events that cannot be explained by natural processes.

The implication is that David Hume’s famous argument against the possibility of miracles is not really an argument, but simply a disposition.

This is precisely the thrust of an older, but illuminating article on the BioLogos website by historian Rick Kennedy called “Did David Hume ‘Banish’ Miracles?” I highly recommend this article for anyone (not just philosophers) interested in the topic.

And BioLogos just reprinted a helpful piece from the Huffinton Post called “Does the Resurrection Contradict Science?

I wish you good reading.

And I look forward to interacting with anyone interested tonight on Facebook Live.

 

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Science, Biblical Faith, and the Resurrection

What is the meaning of the Resurrection in a scientific age?

As we approach Easter this year, BioLogos is sponsoring a Facebook Live event on this topic. It will take place at 7:00 pm EST on Tuesday, March 27, 2018.

I will be one of the four BioLogos participants. The others are April Cordero, Jim Stump, and Kathryn Applegate.

If you are interested, you are invited to participate with your questions. It is meant to be an open conversation.

All you need to do is to go to the BioLogos Facebook page at 7:00 pm EST on March 27. If you’re not able to make it, the entire discussion will be posted there after the event.

My BioLogos Posts on the Resurrection

BioLogos will also be posting a number of short reflections on the resurrection, including two that I wrote. They will be posted on the day of the Facebook Live event and are meant to answer common questions people have raised.

One of my posts will address the question of why the resurrection of Jesus is so important to Christian faith, so much so that Paul says that if Christ has not been raised then our faith is vain or useless (1 Cor 15:14).

My other post will address the issue of the diversity of resurrection accounts in the Gospels, none of which are exactly the same. Should that be a problem for us? Should we try to harmonize them?

Explore the Bible, Theology, and Spiritual Formation: Take a Course at Northeastern Seminary!

I’ve blogged before about Northeastern Seminary, in Rochester, NY, where I teach biblical worldview and exegesis.

In that blog I called Northeastern Seminary “a hidden gem,” because of its amazing grounding in Scripture, combined with its focus on the ecumenical traditions of the church and its openness to addressing the complex issues of our times.

Changes in the Curriculum at Northeastern Seminary

Since I wrote that blog post, the Seminary has embarked on a pretty significant revision of its curriculum, which will allow more flexibility for students to take courses full-time or part-time, either onsite or online, in whatever order makes sense to them.

In the Fall of 2018 I will be teaching one online course (an introduction to biblical exegesis) and two onsite courses (one on the biblical worldview and an exegesis course on 1 Samuel).

How do we approach theological education at Northeastern Seminary? Here are three faculty perspectives on biblical interpretation and spiritual formation.

Dr. Esau McCaulley—Being in the Word

Dr. Esau McCaulley is Assistant Professor of New Testament and Early Christianity at Northeastern Seminary. He teaches an introduction to biblical study in the new curriculum called “Being in the Word,” as well as exegesis courses on particular New Testament books (such as Romans, Galatians, Ephesians, and Revelation).

In this short video clip (two and a half minutes) Dr. McCaulley shares his passion to help students read biblical texts carefully, beyond their untested assumptions, such that they might encounter the living God, who is the author of Scripture.

Dr. Rebecca Letterman—Being Human

Dr. Rebecca Letterman is Associate Professor of Spiritual Formation at Northeastern Seminary. She teaches a foundational course on formative spirituality in the new curriculum called “Being Human,” as well as other courses in pastoral and spiritual formation.

You can watch a two minute video here of Dr. Letterman speaking to the importance of personal and spiritual faith development for Christian authenticity.

Dr. J. Richard Middleton—Being in the Story

As Professor of Biblical Worldview and Exegesis at Northeastern Seminary, I teach a course on the biblical worldview in the new curriculum called “Being in the Story,” plus an introduction to biblical exegesis for teaching and preaching, and exegesis courses on selected parts of the Old Testament (such as Genesis, 1 Samuel, Job, and the Psalms).

You can click here for a short (minute and a half) video of my discussion of why it is important to study Scripture holistically, for its worldview, with a focus on our response to God’s claim on our lives.

Visiting Students Can Sample a Graduate Course: What Are the Options?

Northeastern Seminary is currently offering a good deal to anyone who wants to explore theological education by taking a course, either onsite or online.

You can find out more here, including the low cost for visiting students to sample a course (for either credit or audit); and you can explore which courses are offered when, to see what might fit your schedule.