The Ethical Challenge of the Imago Dei—Human Rights and Beyond

I was recently invited to write a blog post on humanity as imago Dei (“image of God”) for the Imago Dei Fund.

My post is now published online, with the title: “The Ethical Challenge of the Image of God in the 21st Century – Human Rights and Beyond.”

After sketching the meaning of the imago Dei and some of its ethical implications, the post concludes by exploring the compassion of God for the foreigner/refugee, which those made in God’s image are called to imitate.

Interestingly, my colleague in New Testament, Esau McCaulley, has recently written a blog post on a similar theme, entitled “The Slave, the Foreigner, and the Compassion of Israel.”

The Imago Dei Fund

Their website of the Imago Dei Fund describes them as “a grant-making organization working with our grantee partners to co-create a more just and more free world in which all human beings can thrive and flourish together.”

One of the issues the Imago Dei Fund addresses is human rights (as part of their commitment to “justice and mercy“). This was the topic I was invited to write about, based on the biblical teaching of humans as imago Dei.

Besides human rights, the Imago Dei Fund addresses matters of ecological justice (“care of creation“) and holistic shalom for persons (“care of souls“).

I invite you to check out the blog page of the Imago Dei Fund, where my post is located (along with other posts on related topics). It has the unusual name of The Inukshuk Blog.

If you want to know what an Inukshuk is, here is an explanation, with a picture.

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Michael Gorman to Give Keynote Lecture at Northeastern Seminary Theology Conference

Northeastern Seminary will be hosting its second Theology Conference on Saturday, March 19, 2016 (the first was held in October 2013 on the theme of New Creation).

The topic for 2016 is Participation in God’s Mission, and the plenary speaker will be Dr. Michael J. Gorman, Raymond E. Brown Professor of Biblical Studies and Theology at St. Mary’s Seminary and University, Baltimore, MD.

Well-known for his writings on Pauline theology and ethics, Dr. Gorman will be speaking on the shaping of the cruciform Christian life through participation in God’s mission, a theme that blends spirituality and ethics with mission.

Dr. Gorman will present a public lecture for a general audience (on the apostle Paul) on the Friday evening before the conference; then he will give the keynote lecture (on the Gospel of John) for the conference on Saturday morning. Both lectures will be based on his current sabbatical research, for which he was awarded a Henry Luce III Fellowship.

Besides Dr. Gorman’s keynote address, the conference will feature concurrent sessions with papers on topics related to the conference theme. Many paper proposals were submitted before Christmas and they are continuing to come in. The deadline for receiving proposals is currently January 4, but there is a rumor it might be extended by a week. But those interested should still get their proposals in ASAP.

The Call for Papers can be accessed here, and further information about the conference will be posted on the Northeastern Seminary website and Facebook page.

This event is held in partnership with the Canadian Evangelical Theological Association (CETA).

For those interested, you can check out Dr. Gorman’s books here and you can access his blog (called Cross Talk) here.

“To Love What God Loves”: Holistic Eschatology Presentation at Cornell University (September 25, 2015)

This Friday (September 25, 2015) I will be giving a talk, based on my eschatology book A New Heaven and a New Earth, at Cornell University, in Ithaca, NY.

The talk is entitled “To Love What God Loves: Understanding the Cosmic Scope of Redemption.” I will address the Bible’s vision of God’s intent to redeem creation and the implications of this holistic eschatology for our lives today.

The talk is co-sponsored by the Asian-American Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship at Cornell together with Chesterton House, a innovative Christian study center on the Cornell campus.

The talk will be presented in the large group meeting of the Asian-American IVCF chapter, which begins at 7:15 p.m. in the Robert Purcell Community Center (RPCC), second floor auditorium.

Prior to the talk there will be a Q&A where I will be interviewed by Karl Johnson, the director of Chesterton House, at 5:00 p.m. in the Robert Purcell Community Center, with pizza provided for attendees.

Further details about the talk can be found at here (including a map, with directions).